Beneficial, Edible and Useful Flowers

Beneficial

List of Flowers sorted by usefulness

Good for beneficial 
bugs and reducing pets.

  • Alyssum
  • Borage
  • Buckwheat
  • Cornflower
  • Cosmos
  • Crimson clover
  • Feverfew
  • Marigold
  • Phacelia
  • Scarlet Sage
  • Zinnia
Soil replenishing
and protecting.

  • Comfrey
  • Crimson clover
  • Hairy vtech
  • Nasturtim
  • Oats
  • Phacelia
  • Poached egg plant
  • Sunflower
  • Winter peas
Eidble and useful.

  • Buckwheat
  • Calendula
  • Chamomile
  • Comfrey
  • Cornflower
  • Echinacea
  • Lavender
  • Marigold
  • Monarda
  • Nasturtim
  • Oats
  • Scarlet Sage
  • Sunflower
  • Valerian
  • Winter peas

 

Label Flowers 2

Chart  of Beneficial Flowers sorted by height. How high or tall they are.  Heights are in ” inches or ‘ feet.

  1. Poached egg plant – 6×6″
  2. Nasturtium – 6″-12″
  3. Alyssum – up to 8″
  4. Phacelia – about 10″
  5. Marigold – around 12″
  6. Crimson clover – 12-20″
  7. Echinacea – 12-30″
  8. Comfrey – 23-30″
  9. Buckwheat 24-30″
  10. Cornflower – 8-32″
  11. Calendula – 1-3′
  12. Lavender – 1-3′
  13. Feverfew – to about 2′
  14. Borage –  2-3′
  15. Chamomile – 2-3′
  16. Scarlet Sage – 2′-3′
  17. Zinnia – 2-3′
  18. Monarda – 2-4′
  19. Winter peas – 2-4′
  20. Hairy vtech – 3-4′
  21. Oats – 2- 5′
  22. Cosmos – 3-6′
  23. Valerian – up to 5′
  24. Sunflower – up to 20″

Label Flowers 3

List of Flowers based on Sun Needs

Full Sun

  • Borage
  • Calendula
  • Chamomile
  • Cornflower
  • Oats
  • Winter peas
  • Zinnia
Full Sun to Partial shade

  • Alyssum
  • Buckwheat
  • Cosmos
  • Echinacea
  • Feverfew
  • Hairy vtech
  • Lavender
  • Marigold
  • Monarda
  • Nasturtim
  • Phacelia
  • Scarlet Sage
  • Valerian
Partial Shade

  • Comfrey

Label Flowers 4

List of Flowers based on soil needs

Average Well Drained

  • Alyssum
  • Borage
  • Buckwheat
  • Cosmos
  • Comfrey
  • Feverfew
  • Hairy vetech
  • Lavender
  • Marigold
  • Nasturtim
  • Oats
  • Phacelia
  • Scarlet Sage
  • Sunflower
  • Valerian
  • Winter peas
  • Zinnia
Fertile/ Rich Moist

  • Calendula
  • Monarda
  • Poached egg plant
  • Cornflower
  • Echinacea
Fertile/ Well Drained

  • Chamomile

Nuteral PH

  • Echinacea

 

Label Flowers 5

Alphabetical List of Flowers, their companion plants and plant benefits.

  • Alyssum – Alyssum in the perfect little flower to tuck into the corners of beds. Alyssum is famous for attracting tiny wasps and other beneficial insects.
  • Borage – Plant with cucumbers, squash, or any crop that needs strong defense from insects. Borage attracts large buzzing insects that dominate their air space.
  • Buckwheat – Mixes well with upright flowers, and makes an attractive backdrop for herbs. A small bed of buckwheat in bloom will attract numerous beneficial insects.
  • Calendula – Plant with spring salad vegetables, peas, carrots, cucumbers. Calendula blossoms are edible and can be used to bring orange color to rice or potato dishes, or snip them onto soups or salads for extra flavor and nutrition. Use clean scissors to snip off petal tips, and compost the rest.
  • Chamomile – Plant with Lettuce, spinach, and other leafy greens grown in spring, as well as calendula, coriander, and other spring-blooming herbs and flowers.
  • Comfrey – Comfrey is a large plant that tends to crowd out its neighbors. Comfrey is a fine source of greens for composting. When the large plants are cut back in summer, old branches are quickly replaced by a fresh flush of foliage.
  • Cornflower – Cornflowers have an upright posture that helps them fit in tight spaces. Intersperse throughout the garden, as cornflower nectar is unusually sweet, and thus a preferred food source for many beneficial insects. Rice-size cornflower seeds are much loved by goldfinches and other small seed-eating birds. Cornflowers may be nibbled by rabbits, especially in early spring when other food is scarce.
  • Cosmos – Tall varieties can form a colorful hedge that attracts bees and other pollinators, and mix well with tall herbs like dill and fennel.
  • Echinacea – Echinacea’s purple blossoms contrast well with pink, yellow or orange flowers. Echinacea is grown for its beautiful flowers and for the medicinal properties of teas and tinctures made from roots, leaves and flowers.
  • Crimson clover – Hardy annual flowers including bachelor buttons and corn poppies. Crimson clover is one of the most beautiful cover crops you can grow.
  • Feverfew – Beds of mint or other tea plants where insects are not wanted. Feverfew repels insects of all nature, so it is a good plant to grow near entryways.
  • Hairy vtech – Plant with cereal rye, winter wheat. When using hairy vetch to improve very poor soil, mixing a balanced organic fertilizer into the soil before planting will give better results.
  • Lavender – Colourful petunias, nasturitums or other annual flowers that contrast with lavender’s gray-green foliage and blue flowers
  • Marigold
  • Monarda – Plant with lovage, salad greens, other shade-tolerant plants. Pastel flower colours look especially cooling in partial shade. Leaves are excellent for tea.
  • Nasturtim – Nasturtiums sprawl out over the ground, so they suppress weeds and shade the soil when grown near tall plants like sweet corn, tomatoes or sunflowers. Nasturtium blossoms, leaves and immature green seed pods are edible.
  • Oats – Plant with Winter peas, winter beans, hairy vetch. Oats are an ideal late summer cover crop where winters are cold enough to kill it; the dead residue forms its own winter mulch, which is usually well rotted by spring. Rotting oat foliage has herbicidal properties, in that it inhibits germination of weed seeds.
  • Phacelia – When growing phacelia to improve very poor soil, mixing a balanced organic fertilizer into the soil before planting will give better results. Mixes well with other cool-season flowers such as orange calendulas, or you can use phacelia as a cover crop or bee plant.
  • Poached egg plant – This low-growing plant spreads into a mat of green foliage covered with flowers. Grow along pathways or edges of beds, or near tall plants like sweet corn or tomatoes.
  • Scarlet Sage – Mixes well with upright flowers or herbs, and the blossoms are much loved by hummingbirds.
  • Sunflower – A rare “shelter” plant, sunflowers can be used to create shade for sun-stressed crops. Tall varieties can serve as trellises for pole beans.
  • Valerian – Plant with low, mound-forming herbs and flowers. Valerian can stand 5 feet (1.5 meters) tall when it is in full bloom. Dried valerian roots are used to make a bedtime tea that promotes sleep. They are also much loved by cats and dogs.
  • Winter peas – When using winter field peas to improve very poor soil, mixing a balanced organic fertilizer into the soil before planting will give better results.  Plant with Wheat, cereal rye, oats.
  • Zinnia – Plant with dill, fennel and other upright herbs, bush snap beans, chard. Tall, single-flowered varieties attract butterflies. Dill, fennel and other upright herbs, bush snap beans, chard. Tall, single-flowered varieties attract butterflies.
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